Wednesday, August 22, 2012

I Am Against Abortion

I'll never get one.

14 comments:

  1. I'm for abortion, and I still hope I never have to get one. Sounds painful.

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  2. I'm "for" it being a legal option. I want it for everyone else. I just know that, if I were a woman, I wouldn't want to get one. Then again. I'm not a woman. So I don't know, really.

    This post was tongue in cheek, I hope you realize. Shock value, if you will.

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    1. I know. I was snarking along with you. ;)

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  3. I am less militant about abortion these days. In some ways, I view it as a good thing. Those little babies go straight to heaven instead of being born into a family that may not want them. On the other hand, so many couples want to adopt that there are always alternatives. Lastly, I could never personally get one ever even if raped.

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  4. I'm for it, myself. I hope you never have to get one, Joe!

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  5. Petticoat PhilosopherAugust 22, 2012 at 4:29 PM

    Tammy--so many couples want to adopt but most of those couples are white and trans-racial adoptions are fairly rare. The result is that white babies are in high demand but babies of color generally get stuck in the foster care system. Something like 80% of children in the system are children of color, many of them babies that were put up for adoption that nobody wanted. It's not that simple.

    I'm "for" abortion, myself. It can potentially prevent a lot of misery, for both children and adults. And it gives women control over their own reproductive lives. Why wouldn't I be for something that does those things?

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  6. I'm pro-aborion although I really hope I don' have to ever have one, the same way I'd prefer not to have any more blood draws (I don't like needles on me). Anyway, even if your post is tongue in cheek, I thought you might want to read this:
    http://www.rhrealitycheck.org/article/2012/08/19/im-pro-choice-but-i-could-never-have-an-abortion

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  7. Even though I'm no longer a Christian, something about the idea of abortion still makes me uncomfortable. I do support it remaining legal, and there are times where it is necessary, such as life of the mother, rape/molestation, or if the pregnancy would keep the woman in an abusive relationship. That said, though, abortion for simply birth control reasons makes me uneasy, and strikes me as being completely unnecessary when there are so many options for birth control available. Also, what about adoption? There are quite a few people out there that want to adopt, give the child a chance at a good life.

    I don't know, maybe it's a bit of a hangover from my Christian days....

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    1. Good to know that I am not alone in this. Maybe it does have to do with having a fundamentalist background...

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    2. I'm not trying to be antagonistic but as an ex-evangelical, I hope I can help you with your "discomfort". Instead of picturing a cute, health full-term newborn that could either go to a good family or not, think about it in terms of the actual pregnancy.

      An abortion has significantly lower rates of morbidity and mortality than a pregnancy. Maternal mortality may be much lower in the United States than in the developing world, but it still exists and is higher than in other developed countries. Besides death and disability, pregnancy comes along with social stigmatization and workplace discrimination(which is supposedly illegal, which means in practice it never ever happens.) That affects women's real jobs that provide real money and benefits that many women need to support their families.
      I consider induced abortion to be a procedure that decreases the risk of death or disability. To make a list of personal characteristics of the patient that should/should not be allowed to have it done is saying that certain individuals should have to take on more risk of death/disability because of their "lifestyle choices." In a condition that primarily affects women, that is gender discrimination.

      Personally, I have been trying to conceive for the last 6 months, so obviously I have decided that I am willing to take on the risks that come along with a "normal/healthy" pregnancy and probably some risks even higher than that. If my health condition were to change and my risk of dying were to increase significantly, I would want to reconsider. I think that it is perfectly valid for someone with a higher risk aversion than mine to decide that not even the normal risks of pregnancy are acceptable.

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    3. "Besides death and disability, pregnancy comes along with social stigmatization and workplace discrimination(which is supposedly illegal, which means in practice it never ever happens.) That affects women's real jobs that provide real money and benefits that many women need to support their families. "

      I think that makes up most of the often referenced income disparity between men and women. Women, after having children, often take up to several years off from being part of the labor force to spend time with their children. There's nothing wrong with that, in fact it's beneficial to child to have that time with their mother, but now the mother has lost out on the work experience and seniority at her job that she would have had otherwise. It sets her back to some extent in her career.
      It would be much better if companies would have a more enlightened view of family and children, but they don't, and they often see parents as a liability as employees, they are too fearful of employees having to take time off for family considerations.

      "Personally, I have been trying to conceive for the last 6 months, so obviously I have decided that I am willing to take on the risks that come along with a "normal/healthy" pregnancy and probably some risks even higher than that. If my health condition were to change and my risk of dying were to increase significantly, I would want to reconsider. I think that it is perfectly valid for someone with a higher risk aversion than mine to decide that not even the normal risks of pregnancy are acceptable."

      I don't judge anyone based on their decision of whether or not to have children. I personally don't want to have children, even though as a man, obviously, I would face no health risks in having a son or daughter, but my own mental illness, and having a long family history of mental illness makes me adverse to the idea of becoming a parent. I don't feel it would be right to pass on the suffering that I have faced in life to another generation.

      Thanks for your counter comments.

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  8. I have had two spontaneous abortions in the last 4 months. Unfortunately, your uterus doesn't ask you whether you are pro-choice or not.

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    1. "I have had two spontaneous abortions in the last 4 months. Unfortunately, your uterus doesn't ask you whether you are pro-choice or not."

      My sympathies :(

      My sister had to face that experience, she had a hard time recovering after a miscarriage, and then had 3 children, but each pregnancy she had, she had to deal with quite a few complications, though her and her children experienced no lasting effects, thankfully...

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